The Catholic University of America

CUA
NOTABLES

  > CUA NOTABLES submission guidelines

 

Awards and Honors

Duilia de Mello, associate professor, physics, was named one of the 100 most influential Brazilians by Epoca magazine.

 

On the Road

Rev. Stefanos Alexopoulos, assistant professor, theology and religious studies, presented the Dec. 5 lecture "When a Column Speaks: The Liturgy of the Christian Parthenon" for the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Colloquium at the art museum of the University of Pennsylvania.

David Bosworth, associate professor, theology and religious studies, presented on "Weeping in Hebrew and Akkadian Prayers” at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting held Nov. 22 to 25 in San Diego.

Jennifer Davis, assistant professor, history, presented a paper on “Copying Capitularies after the Carolingians: Law and Identity in the Tenth to Twelfth Centuries” at a workshop on Transformation of the Carolingian World held Nov. 21 in Princeton, N.J.

Bradley Gregory, assistant professor, theology and religious studies, presented on “Isaiah 14 (LXX) as Narrative Template for Antiochus IV in 2 Maccabees” at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting held Nov. 22 to 25 in San Diego.

Monsignor Kevin Irwin, Monsignor Walter J. Schmitz, S. S. Professor of Liturgical Studies, was the main presenter and respondent at a two-day theological symposium held Nov. 24 and 25 at Mt. Angel Seminary and Monastery in St. Benedict, Ore. The topic was "The Benedictine Charism and Seminary Education."

Charles B. Jones, associate professor, theology and religious studies, presented the paper “The Jesuit-Confucian Encounter in Late Ming China and the Formation of the Secular” at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion held Nov. 24 in San Diego.

David Lantigua, assistant professor, theology and religious studies, delivered a Nov. 21 lecture on “Bishop Bartolomé de las Casas, O.P., the Church of the Poor, and the Origins of Human Rights” for the St. Anselm Institute for Catholic Thought at the University of Virginia. The lecture was preceded by a seminar on “Las Casas and The Only Way,” led by Lantigua.

Monsignor Paul McPartlan, acting dean, theology and religious studies, delivered the ninth annual Holy Spirit Lecture on Nov. 14 at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. He spoke on "An Evangelizing Communion: The Church, the Holy Spirit, and Vatican II." Monsignor McPartlan and Rev. John Galvin, professor, theology and religious studies, participated in a meeting of the North American Orthodox-Catholic Theological Dialogue held Oct. 23 to 25 at Paulist College in Washington, D.C. Monsignor McPartlan gave a report on the latest plenary meeting of the international Catholic-Orthodox dialogue in Amman, Jordan, in September 2014, and a presentation on the recent document of the International Theological Commission, titled “Sensus Fidei in the Life of the Church.”

Nelson H. Minnich, professor of history and of theology and religious studies, attended a meeting of the Pontificio Comitato di Scienze Storiche held Nov. 28 and 29 at the Vatican. He has been appointed as the organizer of a 2017 conference to commemorate Martin Luther’s 95 Theses. That conference will be held in Washington, D.C., and will be sponsored by the Pontificio Comitato di Scienze Storiche.

Jerry Muller, chair and professor, history, served as chair and commentator for a panel on “Capitalism and American Jews” at the Association for Jewish Studies convention held Dec. 16 in Baltimore.

Michael Noone, research professor, law, served as a panelist for a seminar on “Terrorism Victimization of Women and Children: Costs, Lessons, and Future Outlook” held Jan. 30 at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies in Arlington, Va.

Rev. Anthony J. Pogorelc, S.S., Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies visiting fellow, delivered the Pallium Lecture for the Archdiocese of Milwaukee on “Individualism and the Common Good: Can Inclusivity Trump Autonomy in the Quest for a Better World?” at Mount Mary University on Oct. 14.

Paul Scherz, assistant professor, theology and religious studies, presented the paper “Stem Cells, the Body, and Theological Anthropology” at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion held Nov. 24 in San Diego.

Arpad von Klimo, associate professor, history, presented “Why was 1989 peaceful? Hungarian society and the long-term transformation of state violence. The debate about the 1942 Novi Sad Massacre during the 1960s” at the American Society for East European and Eurasian Studies National Convention held Nov. 22 in San Antonio.

Lev Weitz, assistant professor, history, presented the paper "Communal Resources, Gender, and Interreligious Marriage in Medieval Iraq" at the annual meeting of the Middle East Studies Association held Nov. 24 in Washington, D.C. He also organized a panel titled "Religiously Mixed Families in the Medieval Middle East: Intermarriage and Its Consequences."

Rev. Michael Witczak, associate professor, theology and religious studies, presented a morning of reflection for liturgical ministers at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 25. He spoke on “Ministering at Liturgy: A Theology and Spirituality.” The morning-long session explored the teaching of the manifold presence of Christ in the liturgy as a basis for deeper understanding of and participation in the liturgy.

 

Publications

Chorbishop Seely Beggiani, adjunct associate professor, theology and religious studies, wrote Early Syriac Theology, with special reference to the Maronite Tradition, published by The Catholic University of America Press (October 2014).

Joshua Benson, associate professor, theology and religious studies, wrote an introduction to an edition of what may be Nicholas of Ockham’s inaugural sermon at Oxford (given in 1286). The piece was published in Medieval Sermon Studies (Vol. 58).

Rev. John Ford, professor, theology and religious studies, wrote the article "John Henry Newman, théologien contextual," published in Études newmanniennes (Vol. 30).

John Grabowski, associate professor, theology and religious studies, wrote the article “And So He Revealed His Glory: Cana and the Sacramentality of Marriage,” published in The Thomist (Vol. 78, No. 1). He wrote the essay "The Law of Gradualism: A Process Toward God," published Nov. 9 in Our Sunday Visitor.

Bradley Gregory, assistant professor, theology and religious studies, wrote the article "A Reassessment of Sirach's Relationship to Qoheleth: A Case Study of Qoheleth 3:15 and Sirach 5:3," published in Reading Ecclesiastes Intertextually. He wrote "Historical Candidates for the Fallen King in Sirach 10,10," published in Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (Vol. 12).

Trevor Lipscombe, director, The Catholic University of America Press, co-wrote “Trying Physics: Analyzing the Motion of the Quickest Score in International Rugby,” published in The Physics Teacher (Vol. 53).

Robert Miller, O.F.S., associate professor, theology and religious studies, wrote the chapter “The Judges and the Early Iron Age,” published in the book Ancient Israel’s History: An Introduction to Issues and Sources. He wrote the essay “The Baals of Bashan,” published in Revue Biblique (Vol. 121).

Rev. Anthony J. Pogorelc, S.S., Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies visiting fellow, wrote a review of On the Left Bank of the Tiber, a memoir by Rev. Gerald O’Collins, S.J., for the Nov. 24 issue of America Magazine.

W. J. Shepherd, associate archivist, wrote “The Photographs of Terence V. Powederly,” published in the Autumn 2014 edition of Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies. He also wrote a review of the books Britain in Global Politics, Vol. 1, From Gladstone to Churchill (Security, Conflict and Cooperation in the Contemporary World) and Britain in Global Politics, Vol. 2, From Churchill to Blair (Security, Conflict and Cooperation in the Contemporary World) for the October 2014 edition of the Journal of British Studies.

Pim Valkenberg, professor, theology and religious studies, wrote the article titled “Can We Talk Theologically? Thomas Aquinas and Nicholas of Cusa on the Possibility of a Theological Understanding of Islam” for the book Rethinking the Medieval Legacy for Contemporary Theology.

 

Students

Karen Carducci, a doctoral student in Greek and Latin, received a professional development grant from the Classical Association of the Atlantic States in order to attend the first Winter School in Greek Paleography and Codicology in January. The program was offered by the American Academy in Rome in collaboration with the Vatican Library.

Emily Curato, a junior architecture major, won third place in Looking Forward: Re-Imagining The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, a conceptual architectural design competition hosted by the historic Athenaeum of Philadelphia. Meghan Ross, a junior architecture major, received an honorable mention. Overall, 41 CUA architecture students participated in the competition as part of their third-year studio work. Their projects were included in the final exhibit.

Antony Das Prakasam, a graduate student in theology and religious studies, presented on “The Pride of Babylon in Isaiah 47 in Light of the Theory of Self-Conscious Emotions” at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting held Nov. 22 to 25 in San Diego.

Maria Rodriguez, a graduate student in theology and religious studies, presented on "Mary, Model of Obedience: Exegetical Comparison of Lk 1:26-38 and Q. 19:16-22" at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting.

Adam Tune, a graduate student in theology and religious studies, presented on "The Burnt Child Loves the Fire: A Psychological Interpretation of Divine Deception” at the Society of Biblical Literature annual meeting.