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April, 2019

Roundup of Large 2007–2008 Grants Received

By Mary McCarthy

Just as students compete for scholarships, CUA professors compete for grants from outside organizations to fund their research. Below are grants valued at $100,000 or more that they received during and since the 2007-2008 school year:

  • Ian Pegg

    CUA’s Vitreous State Laboratory, under the direction of physics Professor Ian Pegg, received eight grants totaling more than $6.7 million to continue research and development related to the conversion of nuclear waste into stable glass and to improve such processing at two U.S. Department of Energy sites.

  • CUA physics professors continued their long relationship with NASA as nine faculty members received grants from the agency to continue their research within CUA’s Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences.

    • Lutz Rastaetter, research associate, was awarded a five-year $868,000 grant to carry out a project titled “Modeling of Space Weather From the Sun Through the Heliosphere of Earth’s Magnetosphere and Ionosphere.”

    • Geronimo Villanueva, research professor, received a $546,000 grant to study biomarker gases on Mars using high-resolution infrared spectroscopy.

    • Norman Ness, research professor, was awarded a one-year $100,000 grant to research a project titled “Analysis and Interpretation of Voyager 1 and 2 Magnetometer Data.”

    • Three professors, Partti Makela, Hong Xie and Seiji Yashiro, received two three-year grants totaling $433,000 to enable them to better understand solar eruptions of charged particles.

    • Leon Ofman, associate professor, received a $177,019 grant for solar research.

    • Gunther Kletetschka, research associate, was awarded $109,000 for the magnetic testing of praseodymium permanent magnets for microshutter arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope.

    • Reginald Nelson, research professor, received a three-year $104,000 grant for the study of the low solar corona during eclipses.

  • Scott Mathews, assistant professor, and Mark Mirotznik, associate professor, electrical engineering and computer science, received a two-year, $2.7 million multi-university grant, with CUA as the prime recipient. As co-principal investigators, Mathews and Mirotznik are working to develop an enhanced-resolution digital camera with possible uses in detecting improvised explosive devices, identifying terrorists and assessing burn injuries. The grant is being shared with Wake Forest University, the University of New Mexico and the University of Minnesota.

    Mirotznik also received a two-year $124,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to study antenna isolation using antireflective micro-surface coatings, and a three-year $104,000 grant from the U.S. Army for the design, fabrication and characterization of subwavelength electromagnetic materials.

  • Carrie Gardner, assistant professor of library and information science, received a three-year $412,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Science to work with the Washington, D.C., School Librarian Initiative to select, educate, mentor and employ 10 new school librarians.

  • Binh Tran

    John Judge
    , assistant professor of mechanical engineering, has been awarded a $409,287 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program award to study the effects of vibration on collections of micromechanical and nanomechanical devices. He also received a $190,000 grant from the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity for the fabrication and testing of a blast concussion burst sensor.

  • Robert Destro, professor of law, received a $400,000 grant from the Center for the Study of the Presidency to fund his interfaith work and studies.

  • Poul Lade, professor and chair of civil engineering, received a three-year $290,982 grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled “Experimental Study of Stress Rotation Effects in Cross-Anisotropic Sand.”

  • Boncho Bonev, research assistant professor of physics, was awarded a five-year $230,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a collaborative project investigating the composition and origin of comets.

  • Binh Tran, associate professor and chair of biomedical engineering, received a $224,000 grant from the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate the MRI compatibility of implanted medical devices.

  • Ann Corsi, associate professor of biology, received a three-year $200,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the formation of mesoderm cells.

  • Peter Lum, associate professor of biomedical engineering, received a $200,000 grant from the University of Alabama at Birmingham to study tele-rehabilitation, specifically home-based automated therapy to restore arm function after a stroke.

  • From left, Susanne Bennett, Michael Sheridan and Barbara Soniat of the National Catholic School of Social Service. Bennett and Soniat are co-principal investigators in the research Sheridan is carrying out concerning African-American caregivers.
    Michael Sheridan
    , visiting scholar and director of research in the Center for Spirituality and Social Work within CUA's National Catholic School of Social Service, has received a two-year $200,000 grant from Duke University's Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health. Funded by the John Templeton Foundation, the grant supports her research to determine the relationship between the spirituality of African-Americans who care for their elderly family members and those caregivers' physical and mental health.

  • Phillip Regalia, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, was awarded a three-year $194,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a collaborative project studying distributed estimation in wireless sensor networks. 

  • Zhaoyang Wang, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, received a two-year $124,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study universal, automatic and accurate interferogram analysis for optical-based experimental mechanics and its source implementation.

  • CUA's Department of Physics was awarded a $120,000 grant from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a curriculum in nuclear environmental protection leading to a master’s degree.




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Last Revised 29-Oct-08 10:54 AM.